Hernlund Receives 2010 Jason Morgan Early Career Award

John W. Hernlund received the 2010 Jason Morgan Early Career Award at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13–17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is “for significant early-career contributions to tectonophysics.”

Citation

hernlund_johnThe Tectonophysics section is delighted to present the second Jason Morgan Early Career Award to John Hernlund for his seminal contributions to mantle dynamics and the promise of much more to come. Hernlund, a geodynamicist, has a remarkable ability for cross-disciplinary thinking that links geodynamics, seismology, and mineral and rock physics—the essence of tectonophysics, which incorporates all of these disciplines. Shortly after discovery of the postperovskite phase of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 in 2004, Hernlund produced a model inNature proposing a double crossing of the phase boundary between the perovskite and postperovskite phases as an explanation of several perplexing aspects of the lowermost layer of Earth’s mantle, the so-called D” layer. Such a model, coupled with detailed understanding of this phase change and the effect of chemical composition on it, especially the effects of aluminum (Al) and the spin states of iron (Fe), is fueling and will continue to fuel discussion and models about early Earth, the temperature of the core, the heat flow across the core-mantle boundary, the significance of discontinuous zones of ultralow seismic velocities (ultralow-velocity zones, or ULVZs), and more. One such advance already accomplished by Hernlund and coworkers is a model, also published in Nature, postulating a dense basal magma ocean that they envision developed in very early times, cumulates from which may explain the ULVZs. The seeds of much of this work can be seen in Hernlund’s earlier work at the top of the mantle on melting instabilities induced by lithospheric extension when he was still a student at University of California, Los Angeles with Paul Tackley. His ideas have now flowered with these applications to the bottom of the mantle in the early years of his independent career

Harry W. Green, University of California, Riverside

Response

I am honored to receive this award, and I am happy that I can still be considered an “early-career” scientist. For me, this award represents an encouraging vote of confidence from colleagues whom I respect and admire and sets a high standard of expectations for my future. It is also a pleasure to see the breadth of disciplines that are already recognized by this award. It sets a precedent that reflects the broad spectrum of science that finds shelter under the umbrella of tectonophysics.

The award description states that it is granted “for significant early career contributions to tectonophysics.” However, the groundwork for everything I have done was laid long ago by the efforts of my senior colleagues, and I am grateful for their hard work in preparing the way for the next generation of scientists. I also have countless colleagues and mentors (too many to list in this small space) who have shaped my development as a scientist and played vital roles in much of my research. My work is also closely tied to that of my colleagues in many different disciplines. Without the discovery of postperovskite, or the observation of multiple seismic discontinuities in the deepest mantle, there would be no postperovskite double crossing. If there were no detections of ULVZs, or experimental evidence of dense melting in the lowermost mantle, there would be no basal magma ocean. Therefore, this award honors the achievements of researchers who are working in a broad variety of fields and highlights the remarkable synergy by which we are able to address these challenging scientific problems together as a community. We are greater than the sum of our parts.

John W. Hernlund, University of California, Berkeley

Keir Receives 2011 Jason Morgan Early Career Award

Derek Keir received the 2011 Jason Morgan Early Career Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5–9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for significant early-career contributions in tectonophysics.

Citation

keir_derekThe AGU Tectonophysics section is pleased to present the third Jason Morgan Early Career Award to Derek Keir for discoveries resulting from his innovative and tireless efforts to elucidate the role of magma intrusion in large-scale strain accommodation prior to and during continental rupture, a stage of the Wilson Cycle that is very poorly understood. Keir is a consummate tectonophysicist; he uses state-of-the-art seismic, structural, and other field geophysical techniques to study in detail a first-order tectonics problem: that of how continents break up as the Wilson Cycle is initiated. To address this problem, one has to go to the only place on Earth where the process is ongoing at this moment: northeastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. These are physically and logistically difficult places in which to do fieldwork; the work of many collaborators must be coordinated to collect the necessary high-quality data, and, equally important, one must have excellent “people skills” to gain access to critical areas and to keep a project moving along, always with the target in mind. After the very large amounts of data are collected at great effort, the motivation must be maintained to ensure that the data are sifted and condensed into a coherent whole and published where large numbers of scientists of many disciplines will see them. Keir’s astounding productivity in some of the world’s best scientific journals in his fledgling scientific career attests to his possession of such motivation and the caliber of his writing skills. The equally impressive number of citations of these papers attests to his choice of important topics, the rigor of his analyses, and the quality of the results. His quiet, modest demeanor belies his strong commitment to teaching and outreach, and his career to date exemplifies AGU’s aim to promote discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity.

 

Harry W. Green, University of California, Riverside

Response

I am sincerely grateful to the Tectonophysics section of AGU for considering me as a recipient of this prestigious award. These days, early-career scientists face an ever increasing challenge navigating their way toward independent careers. The international science community is large and complex, and the standards are high. It is therefore very important for the community to continue supporting young scientists through opportunities in funding and resources, sound mentoring, and encouragement to contribute back to the community. I have been fortunate to have had all these ingredients in my career to date.

First, I am grateful to my Ph.D. advisor, Cindy Ebinger. Her enthusiasm, generosity, and unwavering determination in Earth science are truly inspirational. I also thank my closest established colleagues in Europe and Ethiopia: Graham Stuart, Mike Kendall, Tim Wright, Sylvie Leroy, and Atalay Ayele, who continue to provide valuable mentoring and scientific collaboration. I have built a fledging career on a core of seismic experiments in Ethiopia and Yemen. I am therefore indebted to Alex Brisbourne and colleagues at SEIS-UK for the fabulous opportunities facilitated, as well as to collaborators at Addis Ababa University and the Yemen Seismological Observatory Center. In the United States the platforms provided to young scientists by AGU and the Geodynamic Processes at Rifting and Subducting Margins (GeoPRISMS) program to contribute to, and integrate with, the broader community have also been exceptionally important.

Young scientists are the future, and I have already worked with and learned from a suite of young and exceptionally talented seismologists, geodesists, geochemists, and volcanologists. I look forward to a future of collaborative, multidisciplinary, high­quality, fun, and ethical science from my new base at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

 

Derek Keir, Centre, Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Chen Receives 2008 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award

Yao Chen received the Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award at the 2008 AGU Fall Meeting, held 17 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes an individual scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society.

Citation

chen_yaoYao Chen, of Shandong University, has been awarded the 2008 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award, given by the Space Physics and Aeronomy section of AGU. This award honors a young scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society. Chen has made significant contributions to the field of solar physics with a novel two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model for both the solar wind and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Us-ing this model, he has studied the effect of Alfvén waves on the solar wind, the roles of the ideal MHD instability and magnetic reconnection in driving coronal flux rope ejecta for CMEs, and the effect of the background solar wind on the propagation of the flux rope ejecta. After studying at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Chen returned to China, earning his Ph.D. and working at the University of Science and Technology of China until 2006. In 2007, he took a faculty position at Shandong University, in China, where he currently plays an important role in developing the new Institute of Space Science. On behalf of the Space Physics and Aeronomy section, I am pleased to present Yao Chen with the 2008 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award.

Jonathan J. Makela, University of Illinois, Urbana

Response

I am deeply honored and humbled to be the first recipient of the Basu Early Career Award in Sun-Earth systems science.

I sincerely thank, from deep in my heart, Sunanda and Santimay for their generous bestowal and establishment of the award, and for their very kind consideration of the benefit of the scientific community in developing nations like China and India, especially young researchers in the early stage of their career. I thank my nominator, Xiaohua Deng, at Nanchang University, and the selection committee, chaired by Jonathan Makela. I also thank Chingsheng Wu and Youqiu Hu for supporting my nomination.

The honor is shared by every member of my group at Shandong University (SDU), where we are working together to build a new space physics program. Especially, I thank my colleague Lidong Xia, who moved from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) to our present affiliation together with me. So what we have accomplished at SDU is really a team effort that also involves our younger colleagues, like Quanqi Shi, Hongqiang Song, Shiwei Feng, Hui Fu, and our even younger students. The group is still expanding, taking advantage of the strong support from university authorities and the Chinese space physics community.

The honor is also shared by my thesis advisors, Ruth Esser, at University of Tromsø, and Youqiu Hu and Zhongyuan Li, at USTC, who have taught me how to do the science and be a part of the commu-nity. The honor is certainly shared by my lovely daughter and my wife, the other half of me.

Yao Chen, Shandong University, Weihai, China

Sripathi Receives 2009 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award

sripathi_samireddipalleSamireddipalle Sripathi has been awarded the AGU Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award in Sun-Earth Systems Science. The award recognizes an individual scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society. Sripathi’s thesis is entitled “VHF radar studies of E-region plasma irregularities at low latitude.” He was formally presented with the award at the Space Physics and Aeronomy section dinner during the 2009 AGU Fall Meeting, held 14–18 December in San Francisco, Calif.

Sripathi received a B.S. in physics in 1995, an M.S. in physics in 1997, and an M.Tech in atmospheric sciences in 2000 from Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India. He received a Ph.D in physics from Sri Venkateswara University in 2007 under the joint supervision of P. B. Rao of National Remote Sensing Centre, Hyderabad, and S. Vijayabhaskara Rao of Sri Venkateswara University. His research interests include ionospheric physics, ionospheric electrodynamics, and ionosphere-atmosphere coupling.

2010 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award to Huang

huang_kaimingKaiming Huang has been awarded the Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award in Sun-Earth Systems Science. The award recognizes an individual scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society. Huang’s thesis is entitled “Numerical studies on wave-wave and wave-mean flow interaction for gravity waves.” He is scheduled to present an invited talk in the Frontiers in Aeronomy session (SA12) during the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13–17 December in San Francisco, Calif. Huang will be formally presented with the award at the Space Physics and Aeronomy section dinner on 14 December 2010.

Kaiming Huang received his B.S. in physics from Hubei University in 1991, and an M.S. in radio physics from Wuhan University in 2004. He received a Ph.D. in space physics in 2007 under the supervision of Zhang Shaodong and Yi Fan at Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. His research interests include numerical modeling of atmospheric waves and circulation, observational data analysis on atmospheric dynamics, and lidar and radar techniques in atmospheric remote sensing.

Wang Receives 2011 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early-Career Award

wang_huiHui Wang has been awarded the Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early-Career Award in Sun-Earth systems science. This award recognizes an individual scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society. Wang’s thesis is entitled “High latitude ionospheric current system and its response to substorm and geomagnetic storm.” She delivered an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5–9 December in San Francisco, Calif.

Wang received her B.S. in radio physics from Wuhan University, in China, in 2000. She received her Ph.D. in space physics from Wuhan University in 2006 under the joint supervision of Hermann Luehr at Helmholtz Centre Potsdam–GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany, and Shuying Ma at Wuhan University. Her research interests include ionospheric current systems, field-aligned currents, substorm and magnetotail processes, subauroral polarization streams, thermospheric zonal wind, and air mass density.

Milla Receives 2012 Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award

milla_marcoMarco A. Milla has been awarded the Sunanda and Santimay Basu Early Career Award in Sun-Earth Systems Science. The award recognizes an individual scientist from a developing nation for making outstanding contributions to research in Sun-Earth systems science that further the understanding of both plasma physical processes and their applications for the benefit of society. Milla’s thesis is entitled “Study of Coulomb collisions and magneto-ionic propagation effects on incoherent scatter radar measurements at Jicamarca.” He presented an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3–7 December in San Francisco, Calif.

Marco A. Milla finished his B.S. in electrical engineering at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú in 1997. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. under the supervision of Erhan Kudeki from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in 2006 and 2010, respectively. His research interest involves the development of incoherent scatter radar techniques for the estimation of ionospheric state parameters.

Jian Receives 2009 F. L. Scarf Award

jian_lanPh.D Lan Jian has been awarded the AGU F. L. Scarf Award, given annually to recent recipients for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar planetary sciences. Jian’s thesis is entitled “Radial evolution of large-scale solar wind structures.” She was formally presented with the award at the Space Physics and Aeronomy section dinner during the 2009 AGU Fall Meeting, held 14–18 December in San Francisco, Calif.

Lan Jian received her B.S. in geophysics from University of Science and Technology of China in 2003. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geophysics and space physics, under the supervision of Christopher T. Russell, at University of California, Los Angeles in 2006 and 2008, respectively. Her research interests include various structures in the solar wind, their origin and evolution, and their effect on the space environment of planets.

Zou Receives 2010 F. L. Scarf Award

zou_shashaShasha Zou has been awarded the F. L. Scarf Award, given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar planetary sciences. Zou’s dissertation is entitled “Evolution of high latitude ionospheric convection associated with substorms: Multiple radar observations.” She is scheduled to present an invited talk in the Multi­point Perspective on the Auroral Acceleration Region and M-I Coupling session (­SM10) during the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13–17 December in San Francisco, Calif. Huang will be formally presented with the award at the Space Physics and Aeronomy section dinner on 14 December 2010.

Shasha Zou received her B.S. in geophysics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2004. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric and oceanic sciences, under the supervision of Larry R. Lyons, at University of California, Los Angeles in 2006 and 2009, respectively. Her research interests include magnetospheric physics, ionospheric physics, and magnetosphere-­ionosphere coupling processes.

Muñoz-Jaramillo Receives 2011 F. L. Scarf Award

munoz-jaramillo_andresAndrés Muñoz-Jaramillo has been awarded the F. L. Scarf Award, given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar-planetary sciences. Muñoz-Jaramillo’s dissertation is entitled “Towards better constrained models of the solar magnetic cycle.” He presented an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5–9 December in San Francisco, Calif.

Muñoz-Jaramillo received undergraduate degrees in physics (2004) and electronic engineering (2005) from the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics under the supervision of Piet Martens and Dibyendu Nandy at Montana State University, in Bozeman, in 2008 and 2010, respectively. Muñoz-Jaramillo is currently a Jack Eddy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass., hosted by Edward DeLuca. His research interests include the solar magnetic cycle; magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo theory; and space climate, global (paleo) climate, and long-term solar evolution.